This is your brain on live music
The Hamilton Spectator

This is your brain on live music

The McMaster Institute for Music and the Mind is opening the doors of its ultra high-tech LIVE Lab theatre to the public for a series of six interactive concerts of jazz, experimental and world music.
Alumni Times

Alumni Times: Alive with Possibilities

LiveLab featured around the globe on Daily Planet
Daily Planet

LiveLab featured around the globe on Daily Planet

Is it a lab in a theatre or a theatre in a lab?
CBC

The Therapeutic Power of Music: CBC National Report

Written and Produced by Kas Rousey of CBC National
LIVELab blends art, science and community
Daily News

LIVELab blends art, science and community

One moment, the audience is sitting in the LIVELab experiencing the power of award-winning blues singer Rita Chiarelli’s voice as it echoes through the room, the next; the echo is virtually silenced.
Scientific American

Dance It Out: New lab opens to investigate the vibe between dancers, musicians and audience members

Music affects people deeply. At every stage of life, a large body of research shows, it has a profound impact on behavior and cognition. A new concert hall-cum-laboratory will be the first dedicated facility to examine music’s effect on the brain. The Large Interactive Virtual Environment (LIVE) Lab at McMaster University in Ontario, which opened this fall, will be an experimental space for neuroscientists, physiologists and psychologists to test hypotheses about performance, audience dynamics and musical improvisation.
Creation theory: Scientists are unlocking the biological secrets of creativity
The Globe and Mail

Creation theory: Scientists are unlocking the biological secrets of creativity

Steven Brown must be the first person in the world to have danced the tango inside an MRI machine.
New McMaster lab will look at how a musician’s brain works

New McMaster lab will look at how a musician’s brain works

A new lab at McMaster aims to study some of those unspoken communication gestures and movements. The university's new LIVELab combines 3D motion-capture technology, acoustic controls and brain-monitoring sensors to trace some of the under-studied parts of human communication, especially as it's translated between musicians and a live audience.