Neuroscience reveals how rhythm helps us walk, talk — and even love
CBC

Neuroscience reveals how rhythm helps us walk, talk — and even love

From heartbeats heard in the womb to rhythmic patterns of thought: 'rhythm is life'. Rhythm begins in the womb and the heartbeat. And recent findings in neuroscience reveal that for the rest of our lives, rhythm will continue to have a fundamental impact on our ability to walk, talk — and even love. Take a scenario almost all of us have experienced before. You're at a wedding. Everyone's talking, drinking, milling around. Then the DJ plays that one song — and suddenly, everyone rushes to the dance floor, as if obeying a collective siren call. Some tunes just make us want to move, even if we've never heard them before — but why?
High-tech concert hall measures brain waves and heart rates during performances
The Conversation

High-tech concert hall measures brain waves and heart rates during performances

All evidence indicates that music plays a significant role in every human society, both past and present. When we gather to celebrate, rejoice or mourn, music moves us in powerful ways. Caregivers around the world sing to infants to soothe, play with, and teach them. And yet we are just starting to uncover the profound impact music has on our brain, our emotions and our health.
Body language could be the secret behind the sweetest music
CBC

Body language could be the secret behind the sweetest music

Every musician knows the answer to that age-old riddle 'how do you get to Carnegie Hall?' The answer of course is 'practice'. But there is something else. Getting your chops down is one thing, but being able to communicate non-verbally with other musicians on-stage is another. This struck a chord with researchers at McMaster University in Hamilton.
Speed dating study
CHCH

Speed dating study

As if first dates weren’t nerve-racking enough. A group of brave singles have signed up to let McMaster researchers track their every move. It’s all in the name of de-coding dating body language.
I Got Rhythm: The Science of Song
The Nature of Things

I Got Rhythm: The Science of Song

How does stage fright affect musicians?
The Hamilton Spectator

How does stage fright affect musicians?

Some of the world's greatest musicians have been beset by stage fright.
Fans become lab rats in Ian Thornley’s record release experiment
CBC

Fans become lab rats in Ian Thornley’s record release experiment

Big Wreck frontman Ian Thornley didn't know he was a touch claustrophobic – that is until he decided to release his brand new solo album at McMaster University's Live Lab.
ENGAGE: Computing music to my ears
Compute Ontario

ENGAGE: Computing music to my ears